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Adjutant
 
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Post 05 Mar 2016, 1:03 pm

You just have to see how much DF dislikes Kasich to understand there is no possibility of the GOP rallying around him.
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Post 05 Mar 2016, 1:13 pm

Historically they've always coagulated around the most electable candidate though. McCain and Romney were widely disliked as well, but when push came to shove they got the nod because they were seen as the most plausible candidate for the general. The establishment tried to do something similar this time with Jeb, but once that was seen to have failed they've been flapping round in a panic and taken their eye off the ball. Rubio is a busted flush and they might just as well run Count Dracula on the ticket as Cruz. The only sensible option is Kasich.
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Adjutant
 
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Post 05 Mar 2016, 1:30 pm

You're right...but when Kasich extended Medicaid in applying Obamacare he became a traitor to a certain part of the base. Thou shall not cooperate with Obama and you really better not try to make Obamacare work. That ain't being forgiven.
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Post 05 Mar 2016, 2:48 pm

Sassenach wrote:What seems the most bizarre to me is that of the remaining candidates, Kasich would seem to have by far the best chance of winning against Hillary, but he's a dead man walking. I get that there's a proportion of the base who might perceive him as a 'RINO', but he's clearly more conservative than Trump and less flawed than either Cruz or Rubio. The sensible thing would have been to rally round him as the not-Trump candidate.

That would mean compromise. He's this cycle's Huntsman - clearly a great contender in the actual election but doomed in the primaries.
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Statesman
 
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Post 06 Mar 2016, 10:35 am

Rayjay
He absolutely has a point. It is very depressing for both the party and the country


And I have very large hands. The largest. They are Yuge!! They can't fit in a Dyson Blade dryer...
Which I do not think is depressing.

Kasich winning in Ohio is crucial if the anybody but Trump movement has a chance. And he may be the candidate that finishes second in Michigan with an outside chance of catching Trump. Recent polling doesn't look great though there was one that had him in a close second.
His positions on key issues are very conservative. Meaning he won't attract many Independents in a General once they become well known and he's has to defend them. So he'd have a hard time growing past the core red states.
All of the candidates have extreme views on things like budgets, planned parenthood and abortion, and the role of government in helping people. Including Kasich. His advantage right now is he's the least known nationally. And he's the one behaving civilly.
But he's not extreme enough for the Tea Party crowd that currently dominates the primaries.
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Post 06 Mar 2016, 11:03 am

And I have very large hands. The largest. They are Yuge!! They can't fit in a Dyson Blade dryer...
Which I do not think is depressing.


I guess that explains all the typos... :wink:
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Post 29 Jul 2017, 12:27 pm

The GOP is a laughing stock. It spends its entire existence for the past 7 years crying out for the repeal of Obamacare and now with the deck stacked (the White House, the Senate, the House) these ass clowns cant even organize themselves to offer anything to the people who elected them.

I hope this party either explodes or implodes. No matter what, they just need to go away or tear up what they have and start over.

The behavior of the GOP during the election was pathetic. Their lack of support for agent orange was scandalous and now this. The Dems must be dancing jigs over their opponents' lack of any trace of a strategy.

A new party needs to emerge and soon. A centrist party in my opinion that will win the fencers and restore some semblance of civility to national politics.

Of course we will find the Lindbergh baby first.
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Post 30 Jul 2017, 2:09 pm

dag
The GOP is a laughing stock. It spends its entire existence for the past 7 years crying out for the repeal of Obamacare and now with the deck stacked (the White House, the Senate, the House) these ass clowns cant even organize themselves to offer anything to the people who elected them
.
Actually they campaigned on "repeal and replace".
Trump specifically said "My first day in office, I am going to ask Congress to put a bill on my desk getting rid of this disastrous law and replacing it with reforms that expand choice, freedom, affordability," said Trump on Oct. 25, a day after he St. Augustine speech, in Sanford, Florida. "You're going to have such great health care at a tiny fraction of the cost. And it's going to be so easy."

So the problem was that they couldn't just return to the status quo before the ACA. They had to bring in a plan that would improve upon the ACA.
What they offered were tax cuts for the rich paid for by reductions in health care access by millions...
They couldn't match their promise...
Because their promise was BS. As are most of Trumps promises...
Dag
Their lack of support for agent orange was scandalous and now this.

He's an ignoramus. And a fraud. And the level to which they supported him so far has been the scandal.
They should have followed him on health care?
Trump told the Times that health insurance costs about $1 per month when you're young. "Because you are basically saying from the moment the insurance, you’re 21 years old, you start working and you’re paying $12 a year for insurance, and by the time you’re 70, you get a nice plan," he said.

http://fortune.com/2017/07/20/donald-tr ... -comments/
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Post 31 Jul 2017, 12:10 pm

and now Scaramucci is out ... no worries, even without him the comedians will have plenty of ammo.
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Post 31 Jul 2017, 1:07 pm

Their lack of support for agent orange was scandalous and now this.


..meaning the GOP is reeling with no organization or compass. Whatever happened to the my party right or wrong approach? At one time the GOP seemed to live or die by that code once a primary was won.

Trump may in the end turn out to be a massive blessing in disguise for the tattered, disheveled, cheating, lying, stealing DNC.

No fencer will be able to tolerate this circus side show for more than 4 years.
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Post 31 Jul 2017, 1:47 pm

dag
Whatever happened to the my party right or wrong approach?

.
Scruples. Three senators who realized that they owed their constituents an insurance system that worked best for the majority of their constituents.
They realized that providing tax cuts to the rich while eliminating health care access and increasing health insurance premiums for most of their constituents was unacceptable even if it was their parties approach.

Susan Collins
Going into the week, Collins had repeatedly expressed concerns about the healthcare bill, opposing plans to defund Planned Parenthood, which the Senate's "skinny" bill would have done for one year.

Ahead of the vote, Collins expressed concerns with how the debate was going and why she couldn't support the "skinny" bill.

"While I support many of the components of this plan, this approach will not provide the market stability and premium relief that is needed," she said in a statement Thursday. Collins argued that a better approach would be to come up with a bipartisan idea.

"The ACA is flawed and in portions of the country is near collapse," she added. "Rather than engaging in partisan exercises, Republicans and Democrats should work together to address these very serious problems."

Collins voted "no" on all three healthcare plans proposed by the Senate GOP.

Lisa Murkowski
Murkowski has had concerns about the Senate's repeal-and-replace plan. She supports the federal expansion of Medicaid and keeping funding for Planned Parenthood. She said she voted against the motion to proceed because based on her commitment to "the process."

"I have said pretty consistently that process really does matter, particularly when you're dealing with something that is as direct and personal as health care, something that has an impact on one-sixth of the nation's economy," Murkowski told the Alaska Dispatch News.

Murkowski explained her decision to vote "no" on Friday in a tweet, again pointing to importance of the process, as well as "substance."

"I hear from fishermen who can't afford the coverage that they have, small business owners who can't afford insurance at all, and those who have gained coverage for the first time in their life," she said. "These Alaskans have shared their anxiety that their personal situation may be made worse under the legislation considered this week."
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Post 31 Jul 2017, 4:13 pm

Of course it's scruples. But since when does the GOP act with scruples? The party is lost. There was a time when members of the party would have gladly sacrificed their scruples for the benefit of the party, especially in light of what was promised.

Individually, those who have held out are some semblance of hope, depending on your perspective of course, but collectively, the defiance of this few may turn out to be be an important nail in the GOP coffin.

And don't get me wrong. That's a good thing.
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Adjutant
 
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Post 08 Aug 2017, 7:48 am

LA Times has an interesting piece done on the views of Arizona focus groups . What's interesting to me is the anger by Republicans against corporations and their lack of enthusiasm for tax cuts. Remember when Democrats would wonder why working class/middle class voters would vote against their economic self-interests by supporting Republicans? Well, at least in Arizona Republicans are not happy about their party not serving their economic interests. Of course, that doesn't mean they will vote for Democrats. But there is a lot of anger out there against a Washington serving the interests of corporations as opposed to ordinary people. And they are souring on Trump. 9 out of ten Republicans in the focus groups said Trump favors big corporations over regular people.

http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-p ... story.html